What Do Women Want When It Comes to High Quality Maternal and Reproductive Health Care?

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By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Launched today on International Day for Maternal Health and Rights by the White Ribbon Alliance and partners, the What Women Want campaign aims to gather input from at least one million women and adolescent girls about how they define high quality maternal and reproductive health services. Take the one-question survey and spread the word!…read more

International Day for Maternal Health and Rights: Five Perspectives on Respectful Maternity Care

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By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Tomorrow, 11 April is International Day for Maternal Health and Rights, a call-to-action to address every woman’s right to high quality, respectful care before, during and after pregnancy. Experts in research, midwifery, obstetrics and gynecology and program implementation share insight into respectful maternity care (RMC) and how to integrate the principles of RMC into quality improvement initiatives…read more

World Health Day 2018: Maternal Health Care and Universal Health Coverage

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By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

This Saturday, 7 April is World Health Day, and this year’s theme is universal health coverage (UHC). Accessible maternal health care is a critical component of UHC that affects women, their families, communities and nations at large. We have rounded up resources exploring maternal health care and UHC…read more

New Series from The Lancet Calls for Renewed Attention to Malaria in Pregnancy

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By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

The Lancet recently published a Series with updated information and guidance on malaria in pregnancy. Despite advances in knowledge, prevention and treatment, malaria remains one of the most preventable causes of poor birth outcomes in many parts of the world—and continues to play a large role in global maternal deaths…read more

New Intrapartum Care Guideline from the World Health Organization Focuses on a Positive Childbirth Experience

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By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

To complement the 2016 antenatal care recommendations, the World Health Organization (WHO) has published new recommendations on intrapartum care for a positive childbirth experience. Notably, the guideline recommends respectful maternity care and companionship of choice during labor and childbirth for all women. WHO also states that unnecessary medical procedures should be avoided if labor is progressing normally and the woman and her baby are in good condition…read more

Leading Experts Discuss Fistula, Safe Surgery and the Way Forward

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By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

While safe surgical practices can improve maternal health outcomes, surgery can pose its own risks and complications. The Maternal Health Task Force’s Kayla McGowan recently had the pleasure of interviewing two leading experts in the field of fistula and safe surgery, Dr. Thomas Raassen and Carrie Ngongo. Read key takeaways for the maternal health community….read more

In Jamaica, Obesity Is Linked to Higher Risk of Maternal Death

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By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

While Jamaica has seen a slow decline in maternal deaths, “Indirect causes account for an increasing proportion of these deaths,” said Lovney Kanguru, lead author of a recent population based study examining the consequences of overweight and obesity for Jamaican women of reproductive age…read more