RSVP Today! Global Maternal Health Symposium on 17 September

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By: Staff, Maternal Health Task Force

Please join us on 17 September 2018 to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Maternal Health Task Force, showcase achievements in global maternal health and chart a course forward for critical steps to end preventable maternal mortality and optimize maternal health around the world.

Every 11 Minutes: Hypertensive Disorders in Pregnancy Are Deadly (and Have Long-Term Consequences for Mothers and Children)

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By: Rebecca Lorenzen, Wilson Center

“Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are responsible for over 76,000 maternal deaths globally, killing a woman every 11 minutes,” said Charlotte Warren, Senior Associate at the Population Council, at a recent Wilson Center event about non-communicable diseases in pregnancy, held on World Preeclampsia Day.  

Pregnancy Clubs: Group Antenatal Care in Uganda and Kenya

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By: Shafia Rashid, Senior Technical Advisor, Family Care International (FCI) Program of Management Sciences for Health

Beginning in 2016, Management Sciences for Health began testing the group antenatal care (ANC) model, called Pregnancy Clubs, in eastern Uganda; and later in 2017, the model was adapted for western Kenya. The ANC service design reflects many elements of the “generic model” put forward by J. Sharma et al…read more

Group Antenatal Care in Rwanda: A Master Trainer’s Perspective

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By: Tiffany Lundeen, University of California, San Francisco, East Africa Preterm Birth Initiative ; Yvonne Delphine Nsaba Uwera, University of California, San Francisco, East Africa Preterm Birth Initiative

Tiffany Lundeen, a midwife on the Preterm Birth Initiative-Rwanda team based at the University of California, San Francisco recently spoke with Yvonne Delphine Nsaba Uwera, a Rwandan midwife who serves as a master trainer of group care facilitators, about her observations of group care…read more

World Preeclampsia Day: Recognizing That Delivery Is a Treatment, Not a Cure

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By: Rebecca Britt, Community Education and Engagement Manager, Preeclampsia Foundation

Any woman can develop preeclampsia after delivery, whether she experienced high blood pressure during pregnancy or not. Because the majority of deaths due to preeclampsia happen after the baby is born, it is critical that patients are advised to continue monitoring their health…read more